Microsoft

The Office 365 roadmap for 2018

Theresa Miller - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 06:30

Disclaimer: While the author is a Microsoft MVP in the Office Servers & Services category, this article is provided based on information publicly available at https://products.office.com/en-US/business/office-365-roadmap?filters=#abc No spoilers here, sorry! The official Microsoft roadmaps are moving targets. They give us some indication of what to expect in the Microsoft products and when to expect them, […]

The post The Office 365 roadmap for 2018 appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Three Simple 2018 Information Security Resolutions

Theresa Miller - Tue, 01/09/2018 - 06:30

New Years Resolutions.  Some people love them, and some people hate them. Some stick to them throughout the year, and others have already ignored them at this point in January. That being said, I have put together three simple 2018 Information Security resolutions almost everyone can benefit from. There’s also a plethora of blog posts […]

The post Three Simple 2018 Information Security Resolutions appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

The Top Technology Predictions for 2018

Theresa Miller - Thu, 01/04/2018 - 06:30

2017 was a great year in IT bringing much change in the focus of how businesses are consuming IT.  For example, cloud for many organization is no longer if but when.  We are also now looking at data analytics, virtual reality, artificial intelligence in new ways that benefit the business and not just in ways […]

The post The Top Technology Predictions for 2018 appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Introduction to the CISSP Certification

Theresa Miller - Thu, 12/14/2017 - 06:30

Over the last decade we’ve seen an increased awareness in of information security in organizations.  This has been accelerated by stories about everything from viruses to hackers hitting the news.  This, of course does not account for those stories which do not make it to the front page.  If you aren’t familiar with information security, […]

The post Introduction to the CISSP Certification appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

RDP and PCoIP graphics accelerated virtualization solutions

Terminal Services team blog - Thu, 12/07/2017 - 17:00

This blog post is authored by Ivan Mladenov, Senior Program Manager, RDS/WDG.

Once upon a time getting the content of a computer screen and putting it on the network for a remote access was done entirely in software. The CPU was solely responsible for making sure the app content is rendered, encoded into a video frame, and shipped over the network so a remote user on the other end of the wire can access their desktop and work remotely. The desktops evolution added graphics acceleration, but for a while accelerated graphics was not available to the remote users in a virtual environment. The remote desktop users were restricted to set of productivity applications that did not require GPU.

The advances in the GPU technologies in the past decades changed that. Graphics acceleration became available to desktops and high-end PCs so users can have spectacular gameplay experiences or increased productivity while using high-end computer-aided design applications. The prices for the gamers PCs and CAD workstations rocketed into the sky while more advanced GPUs with more cores and infinitely higher capabilities took over the market. Inevitably democratization of the GPU prices drove the cost down and the GPUs in the desktops became prevalent. Now every app on a modern desktop, laptop, or even a mobile phone can take advantage of a GPU acceleration.

GPU advances completely changed how apps are written and vastly improved the app experiences, however, apps running in virtualized environments were not able to benefit of the presence of a GPU as fast as their desktop counterparts. Many blog posts were written with instruction how to tune apps to run efficiently in virtualized environments. To ensure scalability and performance of the virtual machine many of these posts recommended turning off animations, transparency, clear type and other features that required GPU acceleration. This ultimately achieved the performance and scalability requirements but impaired the user experience. Virtualized apps provided sub-par, and sometimes quite painful, user experience when compared with the same app running on a desktop.

The evolution of the GPUs has advanced enough that a virtual machine can be configured to provide access to physical GPU capabilities to any virtualized application that needs access to an actual physical GPU. There are many different technologies and protocols that can do that, and most of them are already deployed in popular cloud services on Azure, AWS and other hosting providers. However, there are not very many articles that compare the virtualization, remoting, technologies, and protocols that take advantage of graphics acceleration. There are many good reasons for that; remoting technologies are complex to deploy, require quite a bit of knowledge in the space to successfully test, takes quite a bit of time to diligently prepare, properly measure and create a comprehensive report.

Thankfully two experts in the space decided to spend the time and effort to do just that. It has been quite a while since there was an article like that, but Benny Tritsch and Kristin Griffin did an excellent job of comparing two very popular and successful protocols that provide solutions to run virtualized graphics accelerated applications, RDP and PCoIP. Check out the results of their tests and view some of the recorded videos.

The article provides an exhaustive description of the testing methodology and illustrates the findings with text and videos. It does require familiarity with the used remoting technologies and the apps used in the test cases. It is a great illustration of two state of the art remoting technologies available today. The article goes into great details to argue the advantages of the compared protocols and solutions. The tests are done in lab environment with network simulator to isolate Internet unpredictability and create predictable and easy to replicate network conditions. A user can use the prescribed methodology and apps in cloud services like Azure or AWS and make conclusions for themselves in their own test environment.

Categories: , Microsoft

Keep Your Sanity: 5 Ways to Slow Down

Theresa Miller - Tue, 12/05/2017 - 22:37

We are going through yet another time of intense change in the IT industry. Since it is the end of the year, the pundits will start pontificating their view of how the world will look once we get through this transition period. The data center is dead! If you’re not on the public cloud your […]

The post Keep Your Sanity: 5 Ways to Slow Down appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Your Guide to AWS re:Invent Announcements for 2017

Theresa Miller - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 06:30

AWS re:Invent 2017 is one of the most anticipated conferences of the year, since it usually falls towards the end of November. One thing that we all can count on is a slew of announcements during re:Invent 2017.  Luckily for us, AWS makes it easy to keep track of these re:Invent announcements. Let’s take a […]

The post Your Guide to AWS re:Invent Announcements for 2017 appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

New Remote Desktop app for macOS available in the App Store

Terminal Services team blog - Tue, 11/28/2017 - 18:00

This post is authored by Eva Seydl, Program Manager, Remote Desktop Services.

It is time to hit refresh on the Remote Desktop (RD) experience for macOS. Download the next generation application in the App Store today to enjoy the new UI design, improvements in the look and feel of managing your connections, and new functionalities available in a remote session.

Use new device redirections in the remote session

When connecting to a PC or Server remotely you can redirect printers today into a remote session. With the new app the following additional devices can be enabled:

  • Redirect your local microphone
  • Redirect smart cards

Please note that you can’t use a redirected smart card to sign into your remote PC. The redirected smart card isn’t available until after you sign in.

Use macOS shortcuts in a remote session

You can now use the MacOS keyboard shortcuts to cut, copy, and paste in a remote session.

Leverage the new UI to manage and use multiple saved connections

Based on a lot of feedback from customers trying to manage a high number of connections in the previous release, we’ve made the following UI improvements:

  • Assign desktop connections to custom groups.
  • Easily identify active connections in the connection center.
  • Manage a single list of user accounts in the preferences of the app.
  • Store multiple entries of the same username with different passwords.
How to migrate connection data from Microsoft Remote Desktop 8.0?

Verify you have the latest version 8.0.43 installed to migrate your connection data.Next look for Microsoft Remote Desktop in the App Store to download the new application on your Mac running OS X Yosemite or higher. Once installed you can skip the first run experience. In the menu click connections and choose the option to import connections from the other app. Now you are set to use the new app.

Note: friendly names for the connections are not ported to the new app.

How to provide feedback?

Click Help > Recommend New Features in the apps menu to open the UserVoice forum where you can suggest new ideas. Use the opportunity to rate the app in the store.

Learn more about Remote Desktop Services and our other applications.

Categories: , Microsoft

Microsoft Tech Summit – Sydney wrap-up

Theresa Miller - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 06:30

Microsoft kicked off their free, global Tech Summit event in Sydney on 16 & 17 November. This is their first attempt at this event format which is travelling to 13 countries around the world, with a US series also planned. So, what was different and did it work? Sessions, but not as you know them […]

The post Microsoft Tech Summit – Sydney wrap-up appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Getting Ready for AWS re:Invent 2017

Theresa Miller - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 06:30

The time is upon us again, and soon we will prepare to descend on Las Vegas. It is time to begin getting ready for AWS re:Invent. This year’s event begins on November 27th and runs through December 1st.  There are pre-event activities on Sunday December 26th as well, but let’s concentrate on what you’ll want […]

The post Getting Ready for AWS re:Invent 2017 appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Virtualize deep learning environments – is it possible?

Theresa Miller - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 19:24

As an industry, we have years of experience virtualization applications, but can we virtualize deep learning? In my last post, I mentioned HPC applications are architected in several ways. But how can we architect a virtual environments if we don’t understand the applications we’ll run on them? In this post, I’ll describe deep learning applications, and […]

The post Virtualize deep learning environments – is it possible? appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

A great way to collect logs for troubleshooting

Microsoft Virtualisation Blog - Fri, 10/27/2017 - 23:30

Did you ever have to troubleshoot issues within a Hyper-V cluster or standalone environment and found yourself switching between different event logs? Or did you repro something just to find out not all of the important Windows event channels had been activated?

To make it easier to collect the right set of event logs into a single evtx file to help with troubleshooting we have published a HyperVLogs PowerShell module on GitHub.

In this blog post I am sharing with you how to get the module and how to gather event logs using the functions provided.

Step 1: Download and import the PowerShell module

First of all you need to download the PowerShell module and import it.

Step 2: Reproduce the issue and capture logs

Now, you can use the functions provided as part of the module to collect logs for different situations.
For example, to investigate an issue on a single node, you can collect events with the following steps:

Using this module and its functions made it a lot easier for me to collect the right event data to help with investigations. Any feedback or suggestions are highly welcome.

Cheers,
Lars

Categories: Microsoft, Virtualisation

What Powered HashiCorp’s Latest Funding Round

Theresa Miller - Thu, 10/26/2017 - 05:30

The team at HashiCorp have been extremely busy lately, which has been further evidenced by HashiCorp’s latest funding round.  Many of HashiCorp’s products have also been updated around the time of the funding announcement.  HashiCorp is known among virtualization admins, cloud admins, and developers for the variety of provisioning products as well as other ecosystem […]

The post What Powered HashiCorp’s Latest Funding Round appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Container Images are now out for Windows Server version 1709!

Microsoft Virtualisation Blog - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 19:30

With the release of Windows Server version 1709 also come Windows Server Core and Nano Server base OS container images.

It is important to note that while older versions of the base OS container images will work on a newer host (with Hyper-V isolation), the opposite is not true. Container images based on Windows Server version 1709 will not work on a host using Windows Server 2016.  Read more about the different versions of Windows Server.

We’ve also made some changes to our tagging scheme so you can more easily specify which version of the container images you want to use.  From now on, the “latest” tag will follow the releases of the current LTSC product, Windows Server 2016. If you want to keep up with the latest patches for Windows Server 2016, you can use:

“microsoft/nanoserver”
or
“microsoft/windowsservercore”

in your dockerfiles to get the most up-to-date version of the Windows Server 2016 base OS images. You can also continue using specific versions of the Windows Server 2016 base OS container images by using the tags specifying the build, like so:

“microsoft/nanoserver:10.0.14393.1770”
or
“microsoft/windowsservercore:10.0.14393.1770”.

If you would like to use base OS container images based on Windows Server version 1709, you will have to specify that with the tag. In order to get the most up-to-date base OS container images of Windows Server version 1709, you can use the tags:

“microsoft/nanoserver:1709”
or
“microsoft/windowsservercore:1709”

And if you would like a specific version of these base OS container images, you can specify the KB number that you need on the tag, like this:

“microsoft/nanoserver:1709_KB4043961”
or
“microsoft/windowsservercore:1709_KB4043961”.

We hope that this tagging scheme will ensure that you always choose the image that you want and need for your environment. Please let us know in the comments if you have any feedback for us.

Note: We currently do not intend to use the build numbers to specify Windows Server version 1709 container images. We will only be using the KB schema specified above for the tagging of these images. Let us know if you have feedback about this as well

Regards,
Ender

Categories: Microsoft, Virtualisation

Microsoft’s strong SMB story with Microsoft 365 Business

Theresa Miller - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 05:30

When Microsoft announced the Microsoft 365 solution set, a lot of people scratched their heads and wondered what they were thinking. Did this replace Office 365? Was it just a marketing wrapper bundle of existing products? Microsoft staff still get hassled about the naming choice (out of the control of most of them). But now […]

The post Microsoft’s strong SMB story with Microsoft 365 Business appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Join Theresa Miller and Phoummala Schmitt at VMWorld 2017 on The Cube

Theresa Miller - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 05:30

The tech ‘fit’ debate: Universal tech in a couture IT world At VMworld Phoummala Schmitt and Theresa Miller were interviewed on The Cube.  We discussed where our careers started, our goals, what we do, and some of our thoughts on VMWorld 2017.  You won’t want to miss the write-up and discussion! Technology advancements may be […]

The post Join Theresa Miller and Phoummala Schmitt at VMWorld 2017 on The Cube appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Interactive Learning on AWS by Finding flAWS

Theresa Miller - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 05:30

Learning about security is something that is, or should be, on everyone’s todo list. As we look to the public cloud for new ways to deploy and manage infrastructure, we also have to look at how new security models and procedures have to come along with it. An interesting way to make this easier and […]

The post Interactive Learning on AWS by Finding flAWS appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Join me on Datanauts to discuss Migrating Exchange to Office 365

Theresa Miller - Thu, 10/05/2017 - 16:52

Are you thinking about migrating to Office 365 Exchange Online, but  not sure what you should be thinking about for getting started?  Have you started your Exchange Migration, but still finding you have some questions to be answered.  Join me for Datanauts episode where we discuss migrating Exchange to Office 365.  What you should be […]

The post Join me on Datanauts to discuss Migrating Exchange to Office 365 appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Can you virtualize HPC Workloads?

Theresa Miller - Tue, 10/03/2017 - 05:05

You may have heard about high-performance computing (HPC), but have you ever wondered if you can virtualize HPC workloads? It is an interesting question. Data Scientists  build HPC applications to do frame rendering that creates realistic animations, numerical simulation that helps build state-of-the-art jets, even modeling and simulations that create the financial models that our economies […]

The post Can you virtualize HPC Workloads? appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

Docker’s routing mesh available with Windows Server version 1709

Microsoft Virtualisation Blog - Tue, 09/26/2017 - 05:04

The Windows Core Networking team, along with our friends at Docker, are thrilled to announce that support for Docker’s ingress routing mesh will be supported with Windows Server version 1709.

Ingress routing mesh is part of swarm mode–Docker’s built-in orchestration solution for containers. Swarm mode first became available on Windows early this year, along with support for the Windows overlay network driver. With swarm mode, users have the ability to create container services and deploy them to a cluster of container hosts. With this, of course, also comes the ability to define published ports for services, so that the apps that those services are running can be accessed by endpoints outside of the swarm cluster (for example, a user might want to access a containerized web service via web browser from their laptop or phone).

To place routing mesh in context, it’s useful to understand that Docker currently provides it, along with another option for publishing services with swarm mode–host mode service publishing:*

  • Host mode is an approach to service publishing that’s optimal for production environments, where system administrators value maximum performance and full control over their container network configuration. With host mode, each container of a service is published directly to the host where it is running.
  • Routing mesh is an approach to service publishing that’s optimized for the developer experience, or for production cases where a simple configuration experience is valued above performance, or control over how incoming requests are routed to the specific replicas/containers for a service. With ingress routing mesh, the containers for a published service, can all be accessed through a single “swarm port”–one port, published on every swarm host (even the hosts where no container for the service is currently running!).

While our support for routing mesh is new with Windows Server version 1709, host mode service publishing has been supported since swarm mode was originally made available on Windows. 

*For more information, on how host mode and routing mesh work, visit Docker’s documentation on routing mesh and publishing services with swarm mode.

So, what does it take to use routing mesh on Windows? Routing mesh is Docker’s default service publishing option. It has always been the default behavior on Linux, and now it’s also supported as the default on Windows! This means that all you need to do to use routing mesh, is create your services using the --publish flag to the docker service create option, as described in Docker’s documentation.

For example, assume you have a basic web service, defined by a container image called, web-frontend. If you wanted to publish this service to port 80 of each container and port 8080 of all of your swarm nodes, you’d create the service with a command like this:

C:\> docker service create --name web --replicas 3 --publish 8080:80 web-frontend

In this case, the web app, running on a pre-configured swarm cluster along with a db backend service, might look like the app depicted below. As shown, because of routing mesh clients outside of the swarm cluster (in this example, web browsers) are able to access the web service via its published port–8080. And in fact, each client can access the web service via its published port on any swarm host; no matter which host receives an original incoming request, that host will use routing mesh to route the request to a web container instance that can ultimately service that request.

Once again, we at Microsoft and our partners at Docker are proud to make ingress mode available to you on Windows. Try it out on Windows Server version 1709, and using Docker EE Preview*, and let us know what you think! We appreciate your engagement and support in making features like routing mesh possible, and we encourage you to continue reaching out with feedback. Please provide your questions/comments/feature requests by posting issues to the Docker for Windows GitHub repo or by emailing the Windows Core Networking team directly, at sdn_feedback@microsoft.com.

*Note: Ingress mode on Windows currently has the following system requirements:

 

Categories: Microsoft, Virtualisation

Pages

Subscribe to Spellings.net aggregator - Microsoft