Industry news

Copying Files into a Hyper-V VM with Vagrant

Microsoft Virtualisation Blog - Tue, 07/18/2017 - 21:50

A couple of weeks ago, I published a blog with tips and tricks for getting started with Vagrant on Hyper-V. My fifth tip was to “Enable Nifty Hyper-V Features,” where I briefly mentioned stuff like differencing disks and virtualization extensions.

While those are useful, I realized later that I should have added one more feature to my list of examples: the “guest_service_interface” field in “vm_integration_services.” It’s hard to know what that means just from the name, so I usually call it the “the thing that lets me copy files into a VM.”

Disclaimer: this is not a replacement for Vagrant’s synced folders. Those are super convienent, and should really be your default solution for sharing files. This method is more useful in one-off situations.

Enabling Copy-VMFile

Enabling this functionality requires a simple change to your Vagrantfile. You need to set “guest_service_interface” to true within “vm_integration_services” configuration hash. Here’s what my Vagrantfile looks like for CentOS 7:

# -*- mode: ruby -*- # vi: set ft=ruby : Vagrant.configure("2") do |config| config.vm.box = "centos/7" config.vm.provider "hyperv" config.vm.network "public_network" config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", disabled: true config.vm.provider "hyperv" do |h| h.enable_virtualization_extensions = true h.differencing_disk = true h.vm_integration_services = { guest_service_interface: true #<---------- this line enables Copy-VMFile } end end

You can check that it’s enabled by running Get-VMIntegrationService in PowerShell on the host machine:

PS C:\vagrant_selfhost\centos> Get-VMIntegrationService -VMName "centos-7-1-1.x86_64" VMName Name Enabled PrimaryStatusDescription SecondaryStatusDescription ------ ---- ------- ------------------------ -------------------------- centos-7-1-1.x86_64 Guest Service Interface True OK centos-7-1-1.x86_64 Heartbeat True OK centos-7-1-1.x86_64 Key-Value Pair Exchange True OK The protocol version of... centos-7-1-1.x86_64 Shutdown True OK centos-7-1-1.x86_64 Time Synchronization True OK The protocol version of... centos-7-1-1.x86_64 VSS True OK The protocol version of...

Note: not all integration services work on all guest operating systems. For example, this functionality will not work on the “Precise” Ubuntu image that’s used in Vagrant’s “Getting Started” guide. The full compatibility list various Windows and Linux distrobutions can be found here. Just click on your chosen distrobution and check for “File copy from host to guest.”

Using Copy-VMFile

Once you’ve got a VM set up correctly, copying files to and from arbitrary locations is as simple as running Copy-VMFile in PowerShell.

Here’s a sample test I used to verify it was working on my CentOS VM:

Copy-VMFile -Name 'centos-7-1-1.x86_64' -SourcePath '.\Foo.txt' -DestinationPath '/tmp' -FileSource Host

Full details can found in the official documentation. Unfortunately, you can’t yet use it to copy files from your VM to your host. If you’re running a Windows Guest, you can use Copy-Item with PowerShell Direct to make that work; see this document for more details.

How Does It Work?

The way this works is by running Hyper-V integration services within the guest operating system. Full details can be found in the official documentation. The short version is that integration services are Windows Services (on Windows) or Daemons (on Linux) that allow the guest operating system to communicate with the host. In this particular instance, the integration service allows us to copy files to the VM over the VM Bus (no network required!).

Conclusion

Hope you find this helpful — let me know if there’s anything you think I missed.

John Slack
Program Manager
Hyper-V Team

Categories: Microsoft, Virtualisation

Vagrant and Hyper-V — Tips and Tricks

Microsoft Virtualisation Blog - Thu, 07/06/2017 - 22:22
Learning to Use Vagrant on Windows 10

A few months ago, I went to DockerCon as a Microsoft representative. While I was there, I had the chance to ask developers about their favorite tools.

The most common tool mentioned (outside of Docker itself) was Vagrant. This was interesting — I was familiar with Vagrant, but I’d never actually used it. I decided that needed to change. Over the past week or two, I took some time to try it out. I got everything working eventually, but I definitely ran into some issues on the way.

My pain is your gain — here are my tips and tricks for getting started with Vagrant on Windows 10 and Hyper-V.

NOTE: This is a supplement for Vagrant’s “Getting Started” guide, not a replacement.

Tip 0: Install Hyper-V

For those new to Hyper-V, make sure you’ve got Hyper-V running on your machine. Our official docs list the exact steps and requirements.

Tip 1: Set Up Networking Correctly

Vagrant doesn’t know how to set up networking on Hyper-V right now (unlike other providers), so it’s up to you to get things working the way you like them.

There are a few NAT networks already created on Windows 10 (depending on your specific build).  Layered_ICS should work (but is under active development), while Layered_NAT doesn’t have DHCP.  If you’re a Windows Insider, you can try Layered_ICS.  If that doesn’t work, the safest option is to create an external switch via Hyper-V Manager.  This is the approach I took. If you go this route, a friendly reminder that the external switch is tied to a specific network adapter. So if you make it for WiFi, it won’t work when you hook up the Ethernet, and vice versa.

Instructions for adding an external switch in Hyper-V manager

Tip 2: Use the Hyper-V Provider

Unfortunately, the Getting Started guide uses VirtualBox, and you can’t run other virtualization solutions alongside Hyper-V. You need to change the “provider” Vagrant uses at a few different points.

When you install your first box, add –provider :

vagrant box add hashicorp/precise64 --provider hyperv

And when you boot your first Vagrant environment, again, add –provider. Note: you might run into the error mentioned in Trick 4, so skip to there if you see something like “mount error(112): Host is down”.

vagrant up --provider hyperv Tip 3: Add the basics to your Vagrantfile

Adding the provider flag is a pain to do every single time you run vagrant up. Fortunately, you can set up your Vagrantfile to automate things for you. After running vagrant init, modify your vagrant file with the following:

Vagrant.configure(2) do |config| config.vm.box = "hashicorp/precise64" config.vm.provider "hyperv" config.vm.network "public_network" end

One additional trick here: vagrant init will create a file that will appear to be full of commented out items. However, there is one line not commented out:

There is one line not commented.

Make sure you delete that line! Otherwise, you’ll end up with an error like this:

Bringing machine 'default' up with 'hyperv' provider... ==> default: Verifying Hyper-V is enabled... ==> default: Box 'base' could not be found. Attempting to find and install... default: Box Provider: hyperv default: Box Version: >= 0 ==> default: Box file was not detected as metadata. Adding it directly... ==> default: Adding box 'base' (v0) for provider: hyperv default: Downloading: base default: An error occurred while downloading the remote file. The error message, if any, is reproduced below. Please fix this error and try again. Trick 4: Shared folders uses SMBv1 for hashicorp/precise64

For the image used in the “Getting Started” guide (hashicorp/precise64), Vagrant tries to use SMBv1 for shared folders. However, if you’re like me and have SMBv1 disabled, this will fail:

Failed to mount folders in Linux guest. This is usually because the "vboxsf" file system is not available. Please verify that the guest additions are properly installed in the guest and can work properly. The command attempted was: mount -t cifs -o uid=1000,gid=1000,sec=ntlm,credentials=/etc/smb_creds_e70609f244a9ad09df0e760d1859e431 //10.124.157.30/e70609f244a9ad09df0e760d1859e431 /vagrant The error output from the last command was: mount error(112): Host is down Refer to the mount.cifs(8) manual page (e.g. man mount.cifs)

You can check if SMBv1 is enabled with this PowerShell Cmdlet:

Get-SmbServerConfiguration

If you can live without synced folders, here’s the line to add to the vagrantfile to disable the default synced folder.

config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", disabled: true

If you can’t, you can try installing cifs-utils in the VM and re-provision. You could also try another synced folder method. For example, rsync works with Cygwin or MinGW. Disclaimer: I personally didn’t try either of these methods.

Tip 5: Enable Nifty Hyper-V Features

Hyper-V has some useful features that improve the Vagrant experience. For example, a pretty substantial portion of the time spent running vagrant up is spent cloning the virtual hard drive. A faster way is to use differencing disks with Hyper-V. You can also turn on virtualization extensions, which allow nested virtualization within the VM (i.e. Docker with Hyper-V containers). Here are the lines to add to your Vagrantfile to add these features:

config.vm.provider "hyperv" do |h| h.enable_virtualization_extensions = true h.differencing_disk = true end

There are a many more customization options that can be added here (i.e. VMName, CPU/Memory settings, integration services). You can find the details in the Hyper-V provider documentation.

Tip 6: Filter for Hyper-V compatible boxes on Vagrant Cloud

You can find more boxes to use in the Vagrant Cloud (formally called Atlas). They let you filter by provider, so it’s easy to find all of the Hyper-V compatible boxes.

Tip 7: Default to the Hyper-V Provider

While adding the default provider to your Vagrantfile is useful, it means you need to remember to do it with each new Vagrantfile you create. If you don’t, Vagrant will trying to download VirtualBox when you vagrant up the first time for your new box. Again, VirtualBox doesn’t work alongside Hyper-V, so this is a problem.

PS C:\vagrant> vagrant up ==> Provider 'virtualbox' not found. We'll automatically install it now... The installation process will start below. Human interaction may be required at some points. If you're uncomfortable with automatically installing this provider, you can safely Ctrl-C this process and install it manually. ==> Downloading VirtualBox 5.0.10... This may not be the latest version of VirtualBox, but it is a version that is known to work well. Over time, we'll update the version that is installed.

You can set your default provider on a user level by using the VAGRANT_DEFAULT_PROVIDER environmental variable. For more options (and details), this is the relevant page of Vagrant’s documentation.

Here’s how I set the user-level environment variable in PowerShell:

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("VAGRANT_DEFAULT_PROVIDER", "hyperv", "User")

Again, you can also set the default provider in the Vagrant file (see Trick 3), which will prevent this issue on a per project basis. You can also just add --provider hyperv when running vagrant up. The choice is yours.

Wrapping Up

Those are my tips and tricks for getting started with Vagrant on Hyper-V. If there are any you think I missed, or anything you think I got wrong, let me know in the comments.

Here’s the complete version of my simple starting Vagrantfile:

# -*- mode: ruby -*- # vi: set ft=ruby : # All Vagrant configuration is done below. The "2" in Vagrant.configure # configures the configuration version (we support older styles for # backwards compatibility). Please don't change it unless you know what # you're doing. Vagrant.configure("2") do |config| config.vm.box = "hashicorp/precise64" config.vm.provider "hyperv" config.vm.network "public_network" config.vm.synced_folder ".", "/vagrant", disabled: true config.vm.provider "hyperv" do |h| h.enable_virtualization_extensions = true h.differencing_disk = true end end
Categories: Microsoft, Virtualisation

Block Windows XP using selective Ciphers on Citrix NetScaler

Henny Louwers Blog - Tue, 05/06/2014 - 09:48
As you probably know Windows XP is no longer being supported by Microsoft. No (security) updates will be made available for Windows XP making it possibly vulnerable for future exploits. As an organization you will have to decide what you are going to do about these (probably unmanaged) Windows XP workplaces. There will still be […]
Categories: Virtualisation

XenApp 6.5…incoming!

Paul Lowther - Fri, 02/17/2012 - 23:05

Hey folks,

I know it’s been a while and I’m still getting visits to the site.  A lot of the information I posted here is still valid, so thanks for your continued visitations.

I’m just about to embark on getting XenApp 6.5 put into our environment, based on Windows 2008 R2 (of course).  Whereas I won’t be doing the direct engineering myself, I’ll be heading up the team doing it (stuff happens, people move on) but I’ll be able to bring you information as it comes in.

So, keep tuned in.

What’s more we’re looking to do a sizeable implementation of XenDesktop on XenServer too, so I’ll be sure to update you on some of that too.

If you have any requests, let me know – I’ll be sure to try to get the info!

PL


Categories: Citrix

Citrix Receiver and Juniper SSLVPN

Paul Lowther - Sat, 10/02/2010 - 18:25

What do you do if you have a requirement to have your Citrix Farm(s) available outside of the company firewall. ‘Available’ meaning usable on any device, become truly device agnostic!

You could punch some holes through your firewall and hope it meets the stringent company security regulations.

You could buy a Citrix Netscaler solution and use their in-built Access Gateway functionality to ‘easily’ allow ICA traffic into your network.

But…What if your company had already invested in SSLVPN technology and couldn’t justify Netscaler?

The answer, if you chose Juniper, which many companies do due to it’s standing in the technology space and magic quadrant position with Gartner and Forrester, is actually all rather simple.

On September 8th, Juniper released their new Junos Pulse app for iOS4.1 and above. This means that any device currently compatible with iOS4.1 can utilize an SSL connection through the Juniper devices, into a secure company network. Once the connection is established, you can fire up Citrix Receiver, put in your simple connection string for your farm and hey presto, access to your published applications and desktops on XenApp and XenDesktop.

OK, so we’re not device agnostic yet, but…

iOS4.2 is out in November, which will be release for the iPad, a big game changer for mobile computing due to it’s portability and screen real estate (self confessed fanboy!), which will mean Junos Pulse will work immediately, once installed and connected to your SSLVPN device.

For the non-Apple devices, I have it on good authority that Droid, Symbian, Windows Mobile and Blackberry are all in Beta development at the moment and will be released ‘soon’. Great news…and a step towards device agnostic usage, so long as there is a Citrix Receiver for your platform too.

Getting it to work:

Installing the app is as simple as any app from the App Store, configuring it is also pretty simple, what’s more, with the Apple iPhone Configuration Tool for OSX/Windows v3.1, you can create pre-configured connections for your device, which does the ‘hard’ work for your end users!

Configuring the Juniper SSL device is fairly simple too, as long as you are using the NetworkConnect, function your device will have access, albeit fairly pervasive, to the network you’re connecting to.

What do I recommend you do is:

Set up a separate realm for mobile devices, which you specify as the connection string
Create a new sign-in page that is friendly to small screens – check out the Juniper knowledge base for a sample download.
Limit the devices you want to have connect by specifying the client device identifier.
Limit the sign-in screen to be available to the *Junos* browser only.
Add black lists of network locations you don’t want everyone to have access to. These could be highly confidential data repositories or your ‘crown jewels’.
Add white lists of citrix servers you want your folks to have access to while on the network, or if you’re happy that the blacklist is sufficient, allow * for a more seamless and agile implementation which will not need adjustment as your farm grows.

There is a lot of flexibility in the solution and depending on your security needs you can mix and match some of these ideas and more in what constitutes a valid policy for your company. The more controls you add, the more you may need to revisit the configuration as devices arrive and requirements change.

Once you are up and running with NetworkConnect you can configure your Citrix Receiver client, connect and start using your Citrix apps strait away.

I was impressed how quick it was to achieve and painless the process has been made.

I don’t work for Juniper and have only recently become familiar with the technology but in my mind, Junos Pulse is a complete breath of fresh air. In forthcoming releases there will be host checkers and cache cleaners etc to ensure the device is adequately secure before allowing connection.

The area of mobile security is still in it’s infancy, it will be interesting to see if Juniper keeps up with the requirements for more security, or my hope is be the lead for others to follow!

PL


Categories: Citrix

Citrix Merchandising Server 1.2 on VMWare ESX (vSphere)

Paul Lowther - Sun, 03/21/2010 - 10:49

I recently acquired (yesterday) the Tech Preview version of Mechandising Server 1.2 from Citrix, which is specifically packaged for use on VMWare ESX.

Version 1.2 has been out or a short while, and whereas I had it running rather well on a XenServer, my company is a VMWare-only place right now, so getting this into a Production state would have meant jumping through several hoops.  I attempted to convert the Xen package over to VMWare but consistently got issues with the XML data in the OVF.

The new VMWare packaged file, which is around 450Mb, imported without a hitch!  Now I’m up and running on the platform of choice and this should make it easier for me to use in Production!  Good news!

Citrix recommends 2CPUs and 4Gb Ram for the instance.  Depending on your scale of usage, you can get it up and running with 1CPU and 1Gb RAM but that really does depend on how large your Directory data is.  For testing, I recommend 2Gb RAM, although it’s simple to adjust when you are more familiar with the load that is required for your environment.

If I find any gotchas with the configuration or getting Receiver/Plug-ins working with the Web Interface, I’ll let you know!

Thanks for reading, leave a comment!

PL


Categories: Citrix

AppSense 8.0 SP3 CCA Unattended

Paul Lowther - Fri, 03/19/2010 - 14:03

If you’re wanting an unattended installation of you AppSense CCA (Client Communications Agent) you will want to look here.

This is documented in the Admin Guide but I missed it on my first run-through.

The installation is the same for the 32-bit or 64-bit version, simply call the right MSI for your server type.  This is also true for the compatible Operating System versions, there’s only one per architecture but covers all compatible OS, which keeps it relatively simple.

Installation Script @echo off REM *** SETTING UP THE ENVIRONMENT NET USE M: "\\server\share\folder" /pers:no SET INSTALLDIR=M:\ REM **** Installing the AppSense Communications Agent (WatchDog agent installed also!) REM **** Set this VARIABLE for your own (primary) Management Server SET APPSENSESITE=SERVERNAME ECHO Installing AppSense Communications Agent.. cd /d %INSTALLDIR%\AppSenseCCA SET OPTIONS=INSTALLDIR="D:\Program Files\AppSense\Management Center\Communications Agent\" SET OPTIONS=%OPTIONS% WEB_SITE="http://%APPSENSESITE%:80/" SET OPTIONS=%OPTIONS% WATCHDOGAGENTDIR="D:\Program Files\AppSense\Management Center\Watchdog Agent\" SET OPTIONS=%OPTIONS% GROUP_NAME="ZeroPayload" SET OPTIONS=%OPTIONS% REBOOT=REALLYSUPPRESS /qb- /l*v c:\setup\log\cca.log START /WAIT MSIEXEC /i ClientCommunicationsAgent32.msi %OPTIONS%

This will install the CCA, set the installation folders, choose your “preferred” Management Server and then add it to a Deployment Group.

Management Console Considerations

One requirement for the Deployment Group is that it set for “Allow CCAs to self-register with this group”

This is set in the Management Console, in the group you have created, called ZeroPayload here, under the Settings section.  Putting a tick in the box is sufficient to complete the registration setting.

Now, a server will be able to join the group with the above unattended script.

What I have done, to manage how and when the agents and pacakages are deployed, is set the “Installation Schedule” to be set to “At Computer Startup – Agents are installed only when computers are started“.  I have added all the agents into this group but no PACKAGE payloads.  If you now reboot the server at your convenience, once the CCA is installed (in my case part of a wider XenApp install) the server will install the agents and immediately REBOOT the server one more time, since you need to remember that the Performance Manager agent will automatically issue a reboot request upon installation.

If you were to set this as “Immediate” in the Installation Schedule, there would be no control over when your server reboots.  Many people fall foul of that nuance of PM as it’s easy to forget (I’m sure the guys at AppsSense forget that on occasion too!).

One very cool behaviour is that you can add both 32-bit and 64-bit agents into this Deployment Group and your server will only install the version it needs for the given architecture.

So now your server is configured and ready for it’s final deployment.  If you’re like me and have  number of active Deployment Groups, some with a slightly different package payload, you can use this method initially, then move your server to the required deployment group.  If all agent versions are the same, and in the beginning they certainly should be, all that will be deployed when you move to another group is the Packages, and these don’t force a reboot.

One last thing to consider.  Any Environment Manager packages that have “Computer” settings will not be invoked until the next reboot.

So… there you have it in a nutshell.

Leave me a comment if you have experiences to share.

PL


Categories: Citrix

XenApp PowerShell Command Pack CTP3

Paul Lowther - Fri, 03/19/2010 - 09:09

I’ve recently started looking at PowerShell 2.o and bought the “for dummies” book to get me started.  My immediate need for usage of PowerShell was to automate some XenApp farm configurations.  This is where the XenApp Command Pack CTP3 comes into the picture.

Installation:

A pre-requisite, in addition to installing the following two components, is to install .Net Framework 3.5SP1 – this is specific to the XenApp Command Pack and use of CTP3 functionality.

NOTE: Anywhere a ♦ is shown, this is not intended as line break merely a line continuation to overcome the shortcomings in WordPress!

ECHO+ ECHO Installing Windows Management Framework Core (including PowerShell 2.0).. start /wait WindowsServer2003-KB968930-x86-ENG.exe ♦ /quiet /log:c:\setup\log\WMF-PS.log /norestart ECHO Installing XenApp PowerShell Commands.. cd /d "%INSTALLDIR%\Citrix Presentation Server" start /wait msiexec /i Citrix.XenApp.Commands.Install_x86.msi ♦ INSTALLDIR="D:\Program Files\Citrix\XenApp Commands" ♦ /norestart /qb /l*v c:\setup\log\xa-cmds.log

Now I have the Commands installed, it’s relatively simple for me to manipulate the farm in any way I want! As far as I can see, anything that is configurable within the AMC (XenApp 5.0 FP2) can be manipulated with a PowerShell command. This includes both farm settings and server settings. I’ve also been able to set Server Groups, Server Console published icons, Administrator Access, Lesser-mortal-being Access (defined access rights) and more besides.

I would have added some of my code here but there are some sensitive items in it and would have to rewrite a lot just to display it.  It’s quite simple to get some quick results, believe me!

It’s a given that Citrix will increase their use of PowerShell in versions to come, such as FP3 and XenApp 6 for W2K8-R2. This for me can only be seen as a positive move!

I can’t recommend this one highly enough.  Check it out.

Leave a comment and thanks for reading.

PL


Categories: Citrix

AppSense 8.0 SP3 Unattended Installation

Paul Lowther - Fri, 03/19/2010 - 08:18

It’s been a long time in coming but I finally got round to getting some progress with AppSense 8.0 @ work.

I don’t do anything unless I can automate it, so here’s my take on the unattended method for AppSense v8.0, in this case the files I used were SP3.  There is some great information in the documentation for the pre-requisites needed to get the software installed.  This is the condensed and automated sequence.  I recommend you read the documentation too!  One thing that is missing is how to do an unattended installation, which is where I felt it necessary to share my knowledge with you!

A word of warning, this isn’t as end-to-end as I’d hoped.  The pre-requisites and MSI installations are all you need to get the product running on your server but you still have to configure the product with the relevant databases for Management Server, Statistics Server and Personalisation Server, if you are using them.  I did manage to do a lot more with AppSense 7, like defining the database schema to use and setting the admin account to use etc, but I’ve since lost my snippets for v7 (an over zealous colleague being “tidy” on our code file server) and couldn’t find any settings within the MSI that looked like they would be relevant, so it’s install-then-configure this time!

My script here starts off with a server that already has IIS installed, but didn’t have BITS installed, so SYSOCMGR was used to add BITS.  If you’re installing IIS from scratch, ensure you add this component!

The IIS-BITS.inf file is simply:

[Components] BITSServerExtensionsISAPI = ON NOTE:  Anywhere I added the ♦ symbol, it’s not intended as a line break!  I’m just overcoming the shortcomings in WordPress for long lines of continuous text. @echo off REM *** SETTING UP THE ENVIRONMENT NET USE M: "\\server\share\folder" /pers:no IF NOT EXIST M:\ GOTO FAULT SET INSTALLDIR=M:\ REM ** Enable BITS for IIS ECHO Enabling BITS for IIS START /WAIT sysocmgr.exe /i:%systemroot%\inf\sysoc.inf /u: ♦ "%INSTALLDIR%\AppSense\32-bit\IIS-BITS.inf" /r /x REM *** Installing Dot Net 3.5 ECHO .Net Framework 3.5.. cd /d "%INSTALLDIR%\32bit.kit\DotNet35" START /WAIT dotNetFx35sp1.exe /Q /PASSIVE /NORESTART REM *** Installing Visual C++ Runtime 2005 SP1 (needed for hotfixes etc) ECHO Visual C++ Runtime 2005 SP1.. cd /d "%INSTALLDIR%\32bit.kit\vcredist.2005.sp1" START /WAIT vcredist_x86.exe /q:a /c:"VCREDI~3.EXE ♦ /q:a /c:""msiexec /i vcredist.msi /qn"" " REM *** Install MS XML6 Runtime ECHO MSXML6.. cd /d "%INSTALLDIR%\AppSense\32-bit" START /WAIT msiexec /i msxml6.msi REBOOT=ReallySuppress ♦ /qb- /l*v "c:\setup\log\msxml6.log" REM *** Installing AppSense Components cd /d "%INSTALLDIR%\AppSense\32-bit" ECHO Installing 32-bit AppSense Management Server component.. START /WAIT MSIEXEC /i ManagementServer32.msi ♦ INSTALLDIR="D:\Program Files\AppSense\Management Center" ♦ ALLUSERS=TRUE REBOOT=ReallySuppress ♦ /l*v "c:\setup\log\AS-ManagementServer.log" ECHO Installing 32-bit AppSense Management Console.. START /WAIT MSIEXEC /i ManagementConsole32.msi ♦ INSTALLDIR="D:\Program Files\AppSense\Management Center" ♦ ALLUSERS=TRUE REBOOT=ReallySuppress ♦ /l*v "c:\setup\log\AS-ManagementConsole.log" /QB- ECHO Installing 32-bit AppSense Application Manager Console.. START /WAIT MSIEXEC /i ApplicationManagerConsole32.msi ♦ INSTALLDIR="D:\Program Files\AppSense\Application Manager" ♦ ALLUSERS=TRUE REBOOT=ReallySuppress ♦ /l*v "c:\setup\log\AMConsole.log" /QB- ECHO Installing 32-bit AppSense Environment Manager Console.. START /WAIT MSIEXEC /i EnvironmentManagerConsole32.msi ♦ INSTALLDIR="D:\Program Files\AppSense\Environment Manager" ♦ ALLUSERS=TRUE REBOOT=ReallySuppress ♦ /l*v "c:\setup\log\EMConsole.log" /QB- ECHO Installing 32-bit AppSense Performance Manager Console.. START /WAIT MSIEXEC /i PerformanceManagerConsole32.msi ♦ INSTALLDIR="D:\Program Files\AppSense\Performance Manager" ♦ ALLUSERS=TRUE REBOOT=ReallySuppress  ♦/l*v "c:\setup\log\PMConsole.log" /QB-

For the .Net Framework file, don’t go looking for dotNetFx35sp1.exe, since this is merely the download of 3.5SP1 renamed so it doesn’t look like standard 3.5, and was done for my own future sanity if nothing more.

.Net Framework 3.0 is the minimum requirement but I’m aligning all my current work on 3.5SP1 since I may wish to use PowerShell 2.0 as and when possible.  I certainly did for XenApp with favourable results (will post about that later).

Post Installation work:

Once the software is installed, you need to connect to or create the databases you’ll need for your choice of functionality you’re going to make active.

Click Start -> All Programs -> AppSense -> Management Center -> AppSense Management Server Configuration

Go through the GUI, tell it where your blank (but already created) schema resides, present it with some credentials and you’re set!

The only other step you *may* be faced with is that the configuration tool analyses the installation to see if there any anomalies.  These are termed as variances in the GUI.  For me, since I’m logged in as an Administrator anyway, I ask the GUI to repair all variances, in all locations.  Once done, the installation is complete.  The steps are very similar for the Statistics Server and Personalisation Server.  It is recommended (for larger installations) that you put Personalisation on it’s own server instance, but Management Server and Statistics Server can occupy the same instance.

I’m planning on installing the CCA with the XenApp base build, so I will likely post that unattended install next.

Leave a comment, thanks for reading.

PL


Categories: Citrix

Citrix Merchandising Server 1.2

Paul Lowther - Fri, 03/19/2010 - 06:53

I’ve been experimenting with Merchandising Server recently.  Primary objective: To see what all the fuss is about.  How will this make my life (or at least the support team @ work)’s life easier?

Well on first look, it’s all looking rather good!  Here’s why:

  • Delivery of the Receiver software to any compatible device (Windows & Mac)
  • Delivery of Plugins (ICA aka Online/Offline Plugin, EdgeSight, Dazzle, EasyCall, etc)
  • Seamless Updating of new plugin versions (all fully customisable with rules for when to do or when to not do an action)

I can see our rather large user base (35k ICA installs and counting) being quite taken by the fact that they don’t have to seek out a “scripted” install to replace what they already have, we can do the “hard work” for them – and roll it back if a new version sucks (you know it happens occasionally!)

So what’s the catch:

Well since I am bound by the rules that *essentially* we are a VMWare shop at my place of employment, the Merchandising Server is a VM Appliance that is only available for those running XenServer.  This is a big disappointment.  Do you guys realise how many hoops I’d have to jump through to get a XenServer (or two) installed in Production.  Not only that but I’d have to write the documentation to support it, in addition to documenting the Merchandising Server, not a prospect I relish.

Look Citrix we know XenServer is a good product – and it’s free for simple implementations – but it’s not really “enterprise” thinking when you limit the use of a product like this.

But “WAIT”, I hear you say…breaking news…

The good folks at Citrix, in their infinite (albeit slightly tardy) wisdom have done the “enterprise” thing!  Whilst browsing around myCitrix.com today, I noticed that they have just released a VMWare instance!  Now that is good news.

I do have a slight challenge though, my subscription level seems to be limiting my ability to acquire said item.  Fear not, I tell myself, I have an email sat in my Citrix Account Manager’s inbox, asking for assistance of the intervention kind!  If/when I get it, I’ll post about it.  If the step-by-step documentation sucks, I may even write that up too.

If you have client sprawl in your Citrix jurisdiction, I really do recommend you check out the Merchandising Server, it could pave the way for an integrated solution for the future!

PL


Categories: Citrix

Google…Sesame Street

Paul Lowther - Tue, 11/10/2009 - 13:41

Today’s entry is brought to you by the letters J, P and G.

Sesame Street is 40 today and Google is paying homage by changing it’s image to commemorate this momentus day!

I know I spent many an hour clocked in front of the TV watching big bird and the gang…

Google's Image of the day...10th November 2009


Categories: Citrix

Pages

Subscribe to Spellings.net aggregator