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XenApp and XenDesktop における Azure Role Based Access Control の利用

Citrix employee blogs - Sun, 12/03/2017 - 23:00

このブログは、2016年11月に Citrix 米国本社マイクロソフトソリューションエンジニアリング部門 Ole Larsen が執筆したブログ「Azure Role Based Access Control in XenApp and XenDesktop」を日本語訳し、一部修正/加筆したものです。

Azure Role Based Access Control in XenApp & XenDesktop

■サマリー

XenApp および XenDesktop の Azure Resource Manager のサポートにより、Azure クラウドの仮想マシンのカタログを作成および管理できます。このブログ記事では、Azure サービスプリンシパルへロール権限やスコープを定義する方法、およびカスタムロールを定義したサービスプリンシパルを利用して XenAppおよびXenDesktop からAzure への接続を許可する方法について用例を交えながらお伝えしていきます。

■以下本文

Azure サービスプリンシパル

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Categories: Citrix, Virtualisation

Improving Ivanti Application Control Message Boxes

Aaron Parker's stealthpuppy - Sat, 12/02/2017 - 12:37

Ivanti Application Control (previously AppSense Application Manager) is an application whitelisting and privilege management solution; however, I think you’re likely aware of that since you’re reading this article. Application Control has a number of customisable message boxes that are displayed to the end-user for Windows application whitelisting or privilege elevation scenarios. In this article, I’ll discuss improving the end-user experience with some visual flair and text.

Default Message Boxes

Let’s take a look at a typical message box. Below is the default Access Denied message displayed to users on Windows 10 when attempting to start an application that hasn’t been white-listed.

Ivanti Application Control default access denied message box

With apologies to Guy Leech (the original developer of AppSense Application Manager), this message box doesn’t fit with Microsoft’s recommended Windows 7 or Windows 10 desktop UI guidelines nor display anything useful to the end user that is useful or actionable. Side note – on Windows 10, I’d love to see this particular message as a notification instead because there’s no immediate action the user can take.

Here’s another message box – this one is shown for privilege escalation. Similar in a sense to a UAC dialogue box, but this forces the user to complete the action for elevating an application with a reason for taking that action that can be audited.

Ivanti Application Control default self-elevation message box

There are several scenarios where Application Control may display a message to the end user:

  • Access Denied – execution of an application is denied
  • Application Limits Exceeded – the end-user is prevented from running multiple instances of an application
  • Self-Elevation – an end-user can elevate an application via Application Control instead of being granted administrative rights
  • System Controls – the user can be prevented from uninstalling an application, clearing specific event logs or stopping services
  • Time Limits – time limits can be put on application execution
  • Self-Authorization – end-user can be given the ability to whitelist an application themselves
  • Network Connections – controls can be placed on network destinations, paths or ports

So, potentially a reasonable level of interaction with the end-user and thus Application Control can have some impact on the perception of a user’s everyday experience. Fortunately, each of these message boxes is almost fully customisable – Ivanti provides the administrator with the ability to control both the appearance and text in the message to something that may suit a specific requirement or the environment into which it is deployed.

Creating “Good” Message Boxes

Dialog boxes suck (or at least a good chunk of them do). To understand why here’s an excellent article I recommend reading – The Magic of Flow and Why Dialogs Frustrate People. The dialogs interrupt user workflow and it’s safe to assume a user is typically seeing multiple messages in a single session (not just our Application Control messages).

Application Control supports customising the messages as well as the UI with HTML and CSS. With customisable notifications, the Application Control administrator effectively becomes a UX designer; therefore to provide users with the best experience possible and balance security needs of the organisation, we should consider carefully that experience both visually and narratively in the text displayed to the user.

When customising these I recommend paying careful attention to the language and tone of the text. Empowering a user to take the right, or no, action without generating unnecessary service desk calls is important. Here are my 3 recommendations for customising these messages boxes for an environment:

  • Ensure the message boxes fit with Microsoft UX guidelines for Windows – apart from not visually assaulting the senses, fitting in with the standard Windows visual style will provide users with a sense that these messages are a part of the normal Windows desktop workflow
  • Don’t overwhelm the user with explanatory text that they aren’t going to read anyway – avoid dialogue box fatigue. If you can, provide a link to more information, so that the user can choose to read up on why the system has been implemented
  • Don’t assume the user is doing the wrong thing. Taking a default hostile stance via the language or wording used in the messages won’t foster a sense of trust. Yes, insider threats are often the main cause of security breaches, but IT can do its part in building team trust

I believe these to be reasonable principles to consider, but of course, some environments may have specific requirements.

Microsoft has published user interface guidelines for Windows for many years, with what I would call “mixed results” from the developer community. While good design isn’t easy, Microsoft has guidelines on FontsStyle and Tone, and User Interface Principles that are applicable to the Application Control administrator.

Looking for Inspiration

Microsoft has specific message boxes in User Account Control that I’ve used as the basis for improving the messages boxes from Application Control; both visually and in the language/text. Here’s a typical UAC message box on Windows 10 – it provides some immediate visual feedback with colour and simple language for the user to act upon:

Windows User Account Control message box

UAC (and SmartScreen) displays various message boxes depending on the action taken that have different colours to better provide the user with an immediate visual feedback. 

From top to bottom: blocked app, app with unknown publisher, app with a known/trusted publisher

Sticking with an established visual style, we can use these colours in our Application Control message boxes. I haven’t found documentation on the colours from Microsoft, so the hex values below might not be 100% accurate.

Blue (#85b8e8 ) background is from the message box used to identify Windows components or software that is signed and trusted Yellow (#f8d470) background is from the message box that identifies components or applications that are untrusted or not signed Red (#8e000b) background denotes an application that has been blocked by Windows SmartScreen I’ve used a softer red (#bf3235) background from the Ivanti Application Control console instead of UAC

In addition to the visual style, we can use these as examples of the language to use in our customised Application Control message boxes. 

Updating Ivanti Application Control Message Boxes

These message boxes are customisable via HTML and CSS, so we have the ability to exert a certain level of control on the look and feel. To enable the full level of customisation, you’ll need to be running Application Control 10.1 FR3, as the limit on the number of characters in some of the messages has been removed.

Here are the default Message Settings properties:

Ivanti Application Control message settings

Under that advanced button, is the CSS used to customise the visuals. So the first thing we’re going to do is customise that CSS to align the visuals with Windows 10. I am maintaining an updated CSS file to completely replace the default CSS on GitHub, which means that anyone can fork the file, improve it and contribute.

There are a few things that the CSS does and provides customisation for:

  1. Changes the default font to Segoe UI, the default Windows font (instead of Microsoft San Serif). The font used in the user input box in self-elevation message boxes is changed to Consolas instead of Courier New
  2. Hides the red and white X graphic. By default, this image is shown on all message boxes and doesn’t actually fit in with the intention of all messages boxes
  3. Enables a header in the 3 colours shown above
  4. Gives buttons a Windows 10 look
  5. Prevents scrollbars from showing inside the message boxes – because the messages can only be set to a fixed height and width, some scrolling occurs even in the default messages shown in the images at the beginning of this article

At the moment, this CSS isn’t perfect and requires updates to fix the cutting off text on the right-hand side of the dialog box, but I think it’s a huge improvement over what’s provided by default. 

Access Denied

Let’s look again at the default Access Denied message box. This doesn’t fit into the Windows UI, doesn’t necessarily tell the user what’s occurred or tell them whether any further action is required.

Ivanti Application Control default access denied dialog box

With our new CSS in place, we can modify the HTML behind this message to reflect what’s going on, as well as provide the user with a link to a page with more information. Note that because my CSS isn’t currently perfect, I’m cheating a bit by putting a carriage return after “Running this app might put”, so that the text isn’t cut off on the righ-hand side of the message box.

<div class="header red">An app has been prevented from running to protect this PC.</div> <div class="description">An unrecognised or unauthorised app was prevented from starting. Running this app might put your PC at risk. Blocked app: %ExecutableName% Location: %DirectoryName% Description: %AC_FileDescription% Publisher: %AC_CompanyName% Please view the <a href="https://servicedesk.stealthpuppy.com">Information Security Corner</a> for details on why this app was blocked. To install an app, you may need to raise a service request. </div>

Because we have a fixed height and width for the box, I’ve set the height to 690 pixels and the width to 440. Our new Access Denied message box now looks like this:

Ivanti Application Control access denied message box with improved styling

In this example, we are now providing the user with some immediate visual feedback, some reason as to why the application was blocked, some details on what was blocked and finally a link to more information (i.e. the action that the user can take). An external page can provide the user with a framework for understanding what’s going on and whether they should pick up the phone for the service desk (or not), with better detail and interaction than a message box could provide.

Self-Elevation

Now let’s do the same with the Self-Elevation action. Here’s the HTML:

<div class="header yellow">Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device?</div> <div class="description">App name: %ExecutableName% <br/>This action will run this app with elevated privileges. Please provide the reason for taking this action. This information will be logged and audited. Improper use of elevated applications are in violation of the <a href="https://servicedesk.stealthpuppy.com">Acceptable Use Policy</a>.</div>

I’ve set the height to 770 pixels and the width to 460. Here’s the result:

Ivanti Application Control self-elevation message box with improved styling

In this example, we aren’t bombarding the end-user with text nor assuming what they’re doing is a hostile action. If you’re an IT Pro or a developer, there’s a good chance you’ll need to elevate an application several times during a single session, so this could be something you see multiple times a day.

System Controls

For a simple example, let’s update the System Controls message.

<div class="header blue">Uninstall of %ApplicationName% is not permitted.</div> <div class="description">Removal of this application has been denied to protect the integrity of this PC.</div>

Which then looks like this:

Ivanti Application Control system controls message box with improved styling

Here we’ve used blue to differentiate this from the previous two messages.

Be aware of High DPI Displays

Note that today Application Control doesn’t support high DPI displays or scaling above 100% very well. Because those dialog boxes are a fixed size and the contents don’t scale, you get something like this:

Ivanti Application Control Access Denied Dialog at 200% scaling

Ivanti is, of course, aware of the issue and I assume there’ll be a fix in a future update. Until then, at least on Windows 10, you can override the high DPI scaling behaviour. The Application Control Agent folder has a number of executables that run each of the messages. For example, to fix the scaling on the Access Denied message box, set compatibility of AMMessage.exe that the high DPI scaling behaviour is set to System (Enhanced).

Setting Application Control High DPI Scaling Compatibility

Once set, the message box will be set to its correct size and scaled up on high DPI displays, thus the box may look fuzzy depending on resolution and scaling. To avoid setting this on each executable individually on each end-point, use Group Policy or the Application Compatibility Toolkit to set these properties.

Conclusion

In this article, I’ve discussed how to improve the Ivanti Application Control message boxes for both visuals and text. With some effort, we’ve updated the style to better fit in with Windows 10, but these look right at home on Windows 7 as well. Additionally, the text has been improved to provide users with (hopefully) just the right amount of explanation, enabling them to take effective action if needed.

The custom CSS streamlines the visuals and better aligns the message boxes with UI guidelines from Microsoft. While I’ve made the CSS available on GitHub, it could do with some improvement. Opening this up to the community will enable feedback and updates.

This article by Aaron Parker, Improving Ivanti Application Control Message Boxes appeared first on Aaron Parker.

Categories: Community, Virtualisation

Citrix Director 7.16 Can Now Shadow Linux App & Desktop

Citrix employee blogs - Fri, 12/01/2017 - 21:00
Citrix Director is the go-to console for all XenDesktop & XenApp administrators to troubleshoot issues in real time. One of the primary troubleshooting requirements is to help users who are facing issues while using a HDX session (both applications and …   Related Stories
Categories: Citrix, Virtualisation

Citrix Director Supports Domain local groups in XenApp & XenDesktop 7.16!

Citrix employee blogs - Fri, 12/01/2017 - 19:00
Finally, the much awaited support of Citrix Director for multi-forest infrastructures with a one way trust that uses domain local groups to hold users and user-groups is out. This facilitates CSP administrators to troubleshoot users belonging to a tenant forest …   Related Stories
Categories: Citrix, Virtualisation

Citrix Service Provider Partner Enablement

Citrix employee blogs - Fri, 12/01/2017 - 17:00
CSP PARTNER ENABLEMENT!

Back in January, we introduced a series of enablement webinars for CSPs, including Distributor Enablement, Partner Business Track, and Partner Technical Track Webinars. We’ve achieved record-breaking attendance, but continue to receive feedback requesting more on-demand trainings for …

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The Anatomy of Citrix Receiver for Windows 4.10

Citrix employee blogs - Fri, 12/01/2017 - 14:30

The new Receiver for Windows v4.10 houses a lot of new features. Improved DPI support, support for .H265 video encoder mode, improved protocol driver error messages, improvements to advanced preferences, enhanced adaptive transport, improved self-service plugin performance, support for workspace …

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Categories: Citrix, Virtualisation

Scripting Citrix XenServer with PowerShell and Command Line

Citrix employee blogs - Fri, 12/01/2017 - 11:00
In this blog post, it’s my aim to show you the most popular commands for Citrix XenServer in PowerShell and Command line, so you can use them in your automation workflow.

Because, as always, AUTOMATE EVERYTHING! Citrix XenServer is Linux-based, …

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3 New Ways XenApp & XenDesktop 7.15 LTSR Enhances Security

Citrix employee blogs - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 23:00

Now that the latest XenApp and XenDesktop LTSR builds have been out in the wild for a while, I’ve been getting a lot of questions about whether customers should upgrade their platform to the 7.15 LTSR release and what features …

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Updates to the Library in the Citrix Cloud Management Plane

Citrix employee blogs - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 21:00
The Library is the go-to place for viewing and managing offerings from Citrix Cloud services; it has recently been updated to allow for a better experience for IT admins. Admins can now get more information when viewing offerings or doing …   Related Stories
Categories: Citrix, Virtualisation

What’s New with the Citrix SCOM Management Packs – Nov 2017

Citrix employee blogs - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 19:00

The latest Citrix SCOM Management Packs released with XenApp and XenDesktop Version 7.16 release, as always, supports the latest XenApp and XenDesktop, StoreFront, and Provisioning Services versions. This release also supports NetScaler Version 12.0 and ShareFile Version 5.0/5.1.

The noticeable …

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Announcing Workspace Customization for XenApp Essentials Administrators

Citrix employee blogs - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 17:00
Citrix is excited to announce that all XenApp Essentials administrators can now customize the appearance of their workspaces to provide a consistent brand experience for their users.

In this walkthrough, I’ll be showing you a new tab on the Workspace …

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From AI, VR and IoT to Robotics, Tech Has Lots in Store in 2018!

Citrix employee blogs - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 13:00

Each year around this time, we do our best to peer into the future and make predictions about those things that will drive us, fuel innovation, and set the tech world aflame in the coming year. The rapid pace of …

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November News

The Iconbar - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 12:17
Some things we noticed in the RISC OS world this month. What did you see?

RISC OS London show took place - read the Iconbar report.

RISCOSbits makes your Pi-Top into a proper RISC OS machine with a themed cover.

DDE28 get a quick update to fix a bug.

AMCOG updates their new Protector game

!Artworks 2.X3 is now available. ArtWorks newsletter #77 sent out (76 was published over 5 years ago).

No comments in forum

Categories: RISC OS

Your Guide to AWS re:Invent Announcements for 2017

Theresa Miller - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 06:30

AWS re:Invent 2017 is one of the most anticipated conferences of the year, since it usually falls towards the end of November. One thing that we all can count on is a slew of announcements during re:Invent 2017.  Luckily for us, AWS makes it easy to keep track of these re:Invent announcements. Let’s take a […]

The post Your Guide to AWS re:Invent Announcements for 2017 appeared first on 24x7ITConnection.

In a Hybrid Cloud World: Think Beyond Traditional Application Delivery Networking

Citrix employee blogs - Wed, 11/29/2017 - 21:00
Networking is not immune to industry shifting changes around cloud and SaaS computing. Traditional networking perimeters encompassed corporate assets either in an on premises datacenter or third-party co-location centers to the border of corporate networks. The risk factors were minimized; …   Related Stories
Categories: Citrix, Virtualisation

Get #CitrixCertified at #CitrixSummit

Citrix employee blogs - Wed, 11/29/2017 - 17:00

Are you attending Citrix Summit this year? Then why not take the opportunity to get certified. A Citrix Certification will let your customers know that you have proven Citrix expertise, and can significantly improve your earning potential. All Summit attendees

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Chevron Phillips Boosts Security and Empowers Mobility with Digital Workspaces

Citrix employee blogs - Wed, 11/29/2017 - 15:00
“If you build it, they will come.”

That’s not just a famous movie line. It’s also how Chevron Phillips Remote Connectivity & Mobility (RCM) Engineer Ryan Tsamouris describes the increased productivity that the petrochemical joint venture has been able to …

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Categories: Citrix, Virtualisation

Record Breaking Digital Co-Creation Empowers Diversity and Inclusion

Citrix employee blogs - Wed, 11/29/2017 - 13:00

The idea was game-changing. The technology was complex and the opportunity incredibly exciting. Together with teams from Amsterdam, Munich, Bangalore, Sussex, and London, pulling on some of the most creative and diverse work groups, after months of collaboration, many laughs, …

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Categories: Citrix, Virtualisation

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